Vox Article Rating

Abortion is on the ballot in November. The outcome will shape 2024.

  • Bias Rating

    -86% Extremely Liberal

  • Reliability

    80% ReliableGood

  • Policy Leaning

    -90% Extremely Liberal

  • Politician Portrayal

    -61% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

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  •   Conservative
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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

67% : While polls have indicated that Ohio voters are broadly supportive of the proposed constitutional amendment, it's not clear what will happen on Election Day in the increasingly conservative state, and anti-abortion groups are eager to change the narrative that their ideas are political losers.
64% : More recently, activist groups have argued that Republican presidential candidates must double down on anti-abortion bans, contending that any electoral losses the party has suffered to date have been driven by meek commitment and insufficient spending.
61% : Still, anti-abortion groups and some Republican officials continue to argue this electoral confidence in messaging that supports abortion rights is misplaced.
53% : Republicans and local anti-abortion groups tried earlier this year to change state law so that it would be harder for Ohio voters to approve the pro-abortion rights measure in November.
51% : Youngkin and anti-abortion groups are betting that if they can win in Virginia by running emphatically on a 15-week ban (they prefer the more euphemistic "15-week limit"), then Republicans nationwide should feel more confident adopting their playbook in 2024.
50% : After the midterms last year, anti-abortion leaders were quick to point out that Democrats failed to unseat incumbent anti-abortion governors, and that candidates who promised to aggressively restrict abortion access, including Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Ohio Sen. J.D. Vance, prevailed in their contests, compared to Republican candidates such as Mehmet Oz in Pennsylvania and Adam Laxalt in Nevada who shied more from the topic.
46% : The outcome of those contests -- an abortion rights ballot measure in Ohio, a competitive gubernatorial election in Kentucky, and a fight over whether Republicans in Virginia will gain full control of state government -- will shape reproductive health care in those states.
43% : Abortion was a motivating force in Virginia's Democratic primaries, and Virginia Democrats are going all in now to frame the election as a referendum on abortion rights, with more than 40 percent of TV ads released this cycle highlighting the issue.
38% : She focuses on housing, schools, labor, criminal justice, and abortion rights, and has been reporting on these issues for more than a decade.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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