As Trump trial nears its end, the law may give prosecutors an edge - The Boston Globe

May 19, 2024 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    10% Center

  • Reliability

    35% ReliableFair

  • Policy Leaning

    10% Center

  • Politician Portrayal

    N/A

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

-2% Negative

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

52% : Cohen's testimony that Trump "approved" the plan could give prosecutors what they need.
48% : Once Trump was elected, he agreed to repay Cohen for the $130,000 hush-money deal and more.To keep the coverup alive, Cohen said, Trump's company disguised the reimbursement as ordinary legal expenses that arose from a retainer agreement.
44% : And on a surreptitious recording Cohen made on his phone, jurors heard Trump directing that they repay Pecker.
44% : In closing arguments, the defense will likely cast those machinations as typical presidential political tactics.
44% : Yet jurors learned that Trump signed nine of the 11 checks himself.
42% : "He approved it," Cohen replied, noting that Trump then added: "This is going to be one heck of a ride in D.C."Trump, who faces probation or up to four years in prison, is charged with 34 felony counts of falsifying business records, one for each purportedly bogus document: 11 checks to Cohen, 11 invoices submitted by Cohen, and 12 entries in Trump's ledger.
38% : They are also expected to argue that Trump had nothing to do with the records at the heart of the case, which they have already characterized as the sort of back-office paperwork that a president would never bother touching.
32% : He told jurors that, at his boss's behest, he paid off the porn actor, Stormy Daniels, on the eve of the election, silencing her story of a sexual liaison with Trump.
30% : It might not matter that he did not accuse Trump of personally falsifying the records or explicitly instructing anyone to do so.
26% : "The judge's instructions provide a road map to the jurors," said Scholl, the former prosecutor, noting that "Trump does not have to be the one who says, 'Make that record false.'
22% : And in this case, the prosecutors have laid out that second crime in graphic detail, arguing that in 2015, Trump entered into a conspiracy with Cohen and the publisher of The National Enquirer, David Pecker, to conceal the sex scandals.
21% : Under the New York law that Trump is charged with violating, prosecutors need only show that he "caused" his company to file false records.
13% : And at a meeting in Trump Tower just weeks before he was sworn in, Trump signed off on the fakery, Cohen recounted from the stand.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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