OutSmart Magazine Article Rating

House Passes Bill to Protect Same-Sex Marriage in Landmark Vote

Dec 08, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    24% Somewhat Conservative

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    44% Medium Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    56% Positive

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

67% : The US House voted to pass legislation on Thursday to protect same-sex and interracial marriage, the last step before the measure goes to President Joe Biden for his signature and becomes law.
52% : The push for a vote on federal legislation protecting same-sex marriage rapidly gained momentum after the Supreme Court in June overturned its landmark Roe v. Wade decision.
49% : House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote in an op-ed published to The Washington Post Wednesday she is "overjoyed" that one of the last bills she will help pass while she holds the title of Speaker will be the legislation protecting same-sex marriage in the United States.
46% : While the bill would not set a national requirement that all states must legalize same-sex marriage, it would require individual states to recognize another state's legal marriage.
46% : Justice Clarence Thomas, for instance, when Roe v. Wade was overturned, explicitly called on the court to revisit the 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges decision that cleared the way for same-sex marriage nationwide.
43% : Several conservative members of the Supreme Court seemed sympathetic on Monday to arguments from a graphic designer who seeks to start a website business to celebrate weddings but does not want to work with same-sex couples.
40% : The Supreme Court is currently considering a case that deals with the issue of LGBTQ rights and religious liberty.
37% : In the event the Supreme Court might overturn its 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges decision that legalized same-sex marriage, a state could still pass a law to ban same-sex marriage, but that state would also be required to recognize a same-sex marriage from another state.
36% :The Supreme Court's move in June holding that there is no longer a federal constitutional right to an abortion immediately sparked controversy and criticism from liberal groups as well as concern that the court's conservative majority could take aim at same-sex marriage in the future.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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