Vox Article Rating

Neil Gorsuch has a problem with telling the truth

  • Bias Rating

    10% Center

  • Reliability

    65% ReliableFair

  • Policy Leaning

    10% Center

  • Politician Portrayal

    92% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

54% :This is not a religious liberty claim, it is a free speech claim, rooted in well-established law, which says that the First Amendment forbids the government from compelling people to say something that they would rather not say.
54% : Gorsuch punts on this question, writing that "hypotheticals about photographers, stationers, and others, asking if they too provide expressive services covered by the First Amendment," are not present in the 303 Creative case.
52% : In the past, Christian right advocates have sought sweeping exemptions from state and federal civil rights laws, rooted in their expansive notion of "religious liberty."
50% : Yet this case, built on imaginary grounds, will have very real consequences for LGBTQ consumers, and for anti-discrimination laws more broadly.
45% : Before this case was argued, I wrote that if Lorie Smith had been approached by a same-sex couple and refused to design a wedding website for them, and if she had then been sued for refusing to do so, then she would have a very strong First Amendment defense against such a suit.
44% : In the past, religious conservatives have argued that artists and artisans of all kinds -- including bakers, photographers, and floral arrangement designers -- should also be allowed to discriminate under the First Amendment, because all artistic work necessarily entails some kind of expression.
44% : And it is worth emphasizing that the particular kind of work that Smith does, writing words on a publicly available website, fits more snugly within the First Amendment than a similar claim brought by a wedding cake designer or a florist.
42% : And Smith objects to same-sex marriages.
38% : In ruling in Smith's favor, the Court does not say that any religious conservative can defy any anti-discrimination law.
37% : Indeed, in its brief to the Supreme Court, Colorado expressed doubt that its anti-discrimination law would even apply to Smith.
36% : She says she's reluctant to do so, however, because she fears that if she designs such a website for an opposite-sex couple, Colorado's anti-discrimination law will compel her to also design wedding websites for same-sex couples.
35% : Nor has anyone ever sued Smith for allegedly violating Colorado's anti-discrimination law.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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