Part-time Mainer 'relieved' U.S. Supreme Court will hear his college admissions cases

Jan 24, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    -22% Somewhat Liberal

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    -4% Center

  • Politician Portrayal

    96% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

62% : Related Supreme Court to hear challenge to affirmative action in college admissions
58% : A decision against the schools could mean the end of affirmative action in college admissions.
53% : The part-time Mainer behind two lawsuits challenging race-based college admission standards said he's relieved that the U.S. Supreme Court agreed on Monday to hear the cases, which seek to end affirmative action in higher education.
43% : His organization could lose, the court could rule narrowly against the two universities with limited impact beyond them, or it could rule that all colleges should be barred from using race as a factor in admissions, ending affirmative action in higher education.
36% : The conservative-dominated high court on Monday agreed to hear the group's other challenges to the consideration of race in college admissions, adding another blockbuster issue to a term with abortion, guns, religion and COVID-19 already on the agenda.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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