OutSmart Magazine Article Rating

SCOTUS Overturns Roe v. Wade

Jun 25, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    10% Center

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    98% Extremely Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -1% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

52% : "Seeing this carte blanche invitation to [state] legislatures to eliminate the freedom to make one's own decisions about one's own body and life, especially following yesterday's absurd decision elevating gun rights over public safety," said Lambda's Pizer, "offers a picture of American society potentially transformed in a horrifying direction."
50% : In the Dobbs majority abortion opinion on June 24, the court does overturn two major precedents: Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey.
48% : Planned Parenthood v. Casey, in 1992, said states could regulate abortion once a fetus becomes viable as long as the regulations did not create an undue burden to women who seek an abortion.
47% : Planned Parenthood v. Casey, in 1992, said states could regulate abortion once a fetus becomes viable as long as the regulations did not create an undue burden on women who seek an abortion.
46% : In an unprecedented development, a draft of a majority opinion was leaked to the press on May 2, seeming to indicate that the court was poised to overturn its longstanding decisions protecting the right to abortion.
41% : In a ruling that is expected to have significant repercussions for LGBTQ people, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-to-3 on June 24 that the U.S. Constitution "does not prohibit" states from banning abortion.
40% : Obergefell v. Hodges, striking state bans on same-sex marriage, was issued only seven years ago.
39% : Instead, it summarily dismissed a gay couple's appeal to recognize same-sex marriage.
38% : Lawrence v. Texas, striking state bans on consensual sex between same-sex adults, was issued only 19 years ago.
37% : Lawrence struck down state bans on same-sex sexual relations, Obergefell removed state bans on same-sex marriage, and Griswold removed bans on contraceptives.
33% : He said the majority has "stated unequivocally that "[n]othing in this opinion should be understood to cast doubt on precedents that do not concern abortion," adding that abortion involves taking a "potential life," while the decisions in the other cases do not.
33% : The 6-to-3 decision came in Dobbs v. Jackson, a case in which an abortion clinic challenged a new law in Mississippi that banned abortion at any time after 15 weeks unless there is a medical emergency or severe fetal abnormality.
30% : Lawrence ruled that states could not ban sexual relations between same-sex couples, while Obergefell ruled that states could not prohibit same-sex couples from marrying.
24% : However, Justice Samuel Alito downplayed the concern for how the decision will impact other rights, including the right of same-sex couples to marry, the right to have same-sex relations, and the right to obtain contraception.""These attempts to justify abortion through appeals to a broader right to autonomy and to define one's 'concept of existence' prove too much," wrote Alito, who was joined on the majority opinion by Justices Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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