Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade abortion-rights ruling

Jun 25, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    6% Center

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    92% Extremely Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -28% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

65% : Lawmakers in anti-abortion states will have to decide whether to make exceptions for cases of rape or incest and whether to impose criminal penalties on people who get abortions.
51% : Alito said that because the Constitution doesn't explicitly mention the right to abortion, it needed to be "deeply rooted in the nation's history and traditions" to be protected.
48% : The majority also overturned Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the 1992 decision that reaffirmed Roe and laid out what has been the controlling law ever since.
39% : "The inescapable conclusion is that a right to abortion is not deeply rooted in the nation's history and traditions," Alito wrote.
39% : "On the contrary, an unbroken tradition of prohibiting abortion on pain of criminal punishment persisted from the earliest days of the common law until 1973."
37% : He said that throughout American history, most states criminalized abortion in at least some stages of pregnancy and the "vast majority" criminalized it in 1868, when the 14th Amendment was adopted.
37% : A majority of the U.S. public has consistently supported keeping abortion legal in all or at least some cases since the mid-1970s, according to Gallup data, while only about one in five Americans say the procedure should be illegal under all circumstances.
35% : Thirteen have so-called trigger laws designed to automatically outlaw abortion if Roe is overturned.
33% : A deeply divided US Supreme Court overturned the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision and wiped out the constitutional right to abortion, issuing a historic ruling likely to render the procedure largely illegal in half the country.
29% :Many historians have disputed Alito's reading of US history, arguing that until the middle of the 19th century states generally put no restrictions on abortion.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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