Vox Article Rating

The Supreme Court will hear a big case about whether religion is a license to discriminate

Feb 22, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    -98% Extremely Liberal

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    84% Extremely Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    N/A

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

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  •   Conservative
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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

51% : That's the sort of compelled speech that the First Amendment typically forbids.
46% : This question first arose in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission (2018), where the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.
43% : So it's unlikely that this Court will allow Colorado to apply its anti-discrimination law to religious objectors, because the law does contain an exception for secular businesses such as single-sex gyms.
42% : As a 5-4 Court held in Tandon v. Newsom (2021), "government regulations are not neutral and generally applicable . .
41% : Then, in Fulton v. City of Philadelphia (2021), the Court handed down a similar nothingburger opinion, ruling in favor of a government contractor that refused to work with same-sex couples seeking to foster a child -- but on exceedingly narrow grounds.
40% : States have historically been allowed to decide which forms of discrimination they wish to prohibit and which ones they wish to permit, and there is a great deal of variation among state anti-discrimination laws.
39% : In any event, the plaintiffs in 303 Creative argue that Colorado's anti-discrimination law is not neutral or generally applicable because it only applies to certain forms of discrimination.
38% : In the past few years, the Supreme Court danced around the question of whether religious conservatives have a constitutional right to violate anti-discrimination laws -- and specifically laws prohibiting discrimination against LGBTQ people.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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