COLUMN: Why some in higher education are freaking out about new affirmative action showdown

Jan 25, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    -30% Medium Liberal

  • Reliability

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  • Policy Leaning

    -30% Medium Liberal

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Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

65% : "Affirmative action helps to create a diverse student body and enriches the educational experience of all students, and it must remain protected by the Supreme Court."
61% : For 40 years, the Supreme Court has protected affirmative action that helps colleges open doors for racial minorities.
53% : There were others, though, who welcomed the news that the Supreme Court will hear the case, including Sasha Ramani, a critic of affirmative action and the associate director of strategy for MPOWER Financing, a public benefit corporation that provides loans to students around the world.
50% : "If affirmative action goes away, opportunities to learn from different perspectives and world views will be limited, and that does an injustice to students," Kella told me during a break from her classes in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Monday, after a conservative-dominated Supreme Court agreed to hear challenges to race-conscious admissions.
48% : Speculation about what could happen if affirmative action disappears has been discussed, debated and opined upon for years.
47% : : Essential diversity will be pushed aside if affirmative action goes awayHarvard has consistently maintained that race is one only piece of a much larger pictureat a student body so competitive that only 1,962 students out of a record-high 57,435 applicants were admitted for the class of 2025 - the lowest admissions rate ever for what Harvard calls the most diverse class in its history.
41% : "If affirmative action goes away, opportunities to learn from different perspectives and world views will be limited, and that does an injustice to students."

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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