Out Front Magazine Article Rating

OFM Explains: SCOTUS Ruling on 303 Creative v. Elenis - OUT FRONT

  • Bias Rating

    -60% Very Liberal

  • Reliability

    55% ReliableFair

  • Policy Leaning

    76% Extremely Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    32% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

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  •   Conservative
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Bias Meter

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

51% : In her dissent, Sotomayor called the majority's interpretation of the First Amendment "profoundly wrong.""Today, the Court, for the first time in its history, grants a business open to the public a constitutional right to refuse to serve members of a protected class," Sotomayor wrote.
45% : Advocates and legal experts have raised concerns about how this ruling could lead to the further chipping away of civil rights and anti-discrimination protections not just for the LGBTQ community, but for minorities of race and religion too.
42% : The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Colorado web designer, Lorie Smith, who refused to create wedding websites for same-sex couples.
40% : Smith had expressed a desire to post a notice on the 303 Creative website notifying potential clients that she would not create wedding websites for same-sex couples.
39% : Smith claimed that her religious beliefs prohibit her from recognizing same-sex marriages.
38% : The commissioners are tasked with enforcing Colorado's anti-discrimination act, which says that a person cannot be treated differently because of sexual orientation or gender identity.
30% : Unlike similar cases where businesses have attempted to deny service to the LGBTQ community and were subsequently sued, in this case, Smith sued the state of Colorado, claiming that the state's updated anti-discrimination act of 2022 infringed on her religious freedom to discriminate against same-sex couples.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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