Boston.com Article Rating

She had canceled her phone plan and was ready to die. Now a surprise decision has halted her euthanasia bid.

Oct 10, 2021 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    10% Center

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    78% Extremely Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -6% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

54% : Colombia was one of the first countries in the world to decriminalize euthanasia, and one of only a small number -- alongside Belgium and the Netherlands -- to extend the right to non-terminal patients.
45% : The country's constitutional court ruled in July that the right to euthanasia -- recognized here in 1997 -- applies not only to terminal patients, but also to those with "intense physical or mental suffering from bodily injury or serious and incurable disease."
45% : Determining that Sepúlveda "has a high probability of expecting a life of more than 6 months," the committee ruled that she isn't eligible for euthanasia.
45% : Responding to the news that Sepúlveda's procedure had been canceled Saturday, the country's health ministry established that a patient without a terminal diagnosis cannot be authorized for euthanasia because the constitutional court has not yet released its complete ruling on the matter -- a claim that was quickly disputed by legal experts, who said court rulings take effect immediately.
41% : Sepúlveda, who considers herself a devout Catholic, started reading about an option that she thought could relieve her fear of what was to come: euthanasia.
40% : Church officials have described euthanasia as a "serious offense" to the dignity of human life; a member of the national bishops' conference urged Sepúlveda to "calmly reflect" on her decision and invited all Catholics to pray that God will grant her mercy.
39% : They pointed to a recent constitutional court decision allowing euthanasia for patients with intense physical or mental suffering from bodily injury or serious and incurable disease, even if the prognosis is not terminal within six months.
38% : No U.S. state permits euthanasia; 10 states and D.C. allow medically assisted suicide for terminally ill, mentally capable adults with a prognosis of six months or less to live.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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