Inside Higher Ed Article Rating

Supreme Court hears arguments on affirmative action

Oct 31, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    -58% Very Liberal

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    -58% Very Liberal

  • Politician Portrayal

    -64% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

59% : The Harvard case decisions -- in 2019 by Judge Allison Burroughs and in 2020 by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit -- came in a much-watched case brought by a long-standing critic of affirmative action on behalf of a group of Asian American plaintiffs.
58% :Prelogar said, "I do think eventually" affirmative action will end in higher education.
57% : The composition of the Supreme Court differs significantly from the last time it upheld the use of affirmative action in college admissions, in 2016, in a case involving the University of Texas at Austin.
56% : When the U.S. solicitor general, Elizabeth B. Prelogar, said the U.S. service academies practice affirmative action in admissions because the military needs a diverse population, Justice Thomas asked his question again.
54% : The brief asked the Supreme Court to repeal its 2003 decision in Grutter v. Bollinger, which upheld the use of affirmative action in admissions by the law school at the University of Michigan.
52% : Three justices -- Ketanji Brown Jackson, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor -- asked questions that suggested support for affirmative action.
50% : The cases represent a chance for opponents of affirmative action to reverse not only the Harvard and UNC decisions but many others that have upheld the use of affirmative action since the Supreme Court ruled in the Bakke case in 1978.
49% : But in arguments before the Supreme Court today, justices with a history of opposing affirmative action -- or new justices expected to oppose affirmative action -- asked questions that reflected skepticism about the practice.
37% : That decision was 4 to 3 because of the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, an opponent of affirmative action, and the recusal of Justice Kagan, who worked on the case as solicitor general before she joined the Supreme Court.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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