Daily Republic Article Rating

Supreme Court starts new term in political spotlight, tilted right

Oct 04, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    -2% Center

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    -6% Center

  • Politician Portrayal

    -31% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

55% : Neither will the political fallout from last term's decisions overturning the constitutional right to an abortion or expanding gun rights, Supreme Court experts say.
55% :Amanda Shanor, a professor of legal studies at the University of Pennsylvania, said at a Federalist Society event last week that a broad ruling for a "color blind" Constitution in affirmative action could put employment discrimination law in the cross hairs "in part because it requires employers to think about race in deciding how they're going to mitigate potential inequalities."
53% : The justices are hearing arguments Monday in a case about the definition of the nation's navigable waters that could further restrict the ability of federal agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency to interpret federal statutes.
49% : In another case, the owner of a website design company argues a Colorado anti-discrimination law violates her constitutional rights because it requires her to design websites for same-sex couples' weddings in addition to opposite-sex ones.
49% : The docket also includes cases on the power states have over commerce beyond their borders, and decisions could curtail, or expand, states' powers over interstate commerce as states such as Texas and California seek to regulate guns, abortion and social media, experts said.
49% : Congressional Democrats, reacting to the court's broad exercise of authority in past terms, have pushed bills to strengthen the Voting Rights Act, or codify abortion access and same-sex marriage.
48% : In the two cases concerning affirmative action, for example, Roberts and other conservatives could decide the case in a limited way, or in a broader way that might cast doubt on other nondiscrimination provisions of civil rights legislation, such as Title VII employment law.
46% :'All personal preference'Rulings from the Supreme Court last term rocked public approval of the institution, which numerous polls show declined sharply after the release of the opinion in June that overturned Roe v. Wade, which first established a nationwide right to abortion.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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