Oneida Dispatch Article Rating

The US has released an ally of Venezuela's president in a swap for jailed Americans, the AP learns

  • Bias Rating

    34% Medium Conservative

  • Reliability

    30% ReliableFair

  • Policy Leaning

    24% Somewhat Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -43% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

-15% Negative

  •   Liberal
  •   Conservative
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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

45% : Maduro's government has argued that Saab is a Venezuelan diplomat, entitled to immunity from criminal prosecution under international law.
44% : Maduro's government has insisted Saab was traveling to Iran to buy food and medical supplies when he was detained in Cape Verde.
43% : Saab, 51, was pulled off a private jet during a fuel stop in Cape Verde en route to Iran, where he was sent to negotiate oil deals on behalf of Maduro's government.
41% : In September, Iran released five American detainees in exchange for the release of nearly $6 billion in frozen Iranian assets and two Iranian prisoners who had been jailed in the United States.
40% : Saab's release would be seen as a major concession to Maduro, the South American country's authoritarian leader who is himself the target of a $15 million U.S. reward for anyone bringing him to New York to face drug trafficking charges.
40% : The charges: conspiracy to commit money laundering tied to a bribery scheme that allegedly siphoned off $350 million through state contracts to build affordable housing for Venezuela's government.
40% : Saab was previously sanctioned by the U.S. Treasury Department for allegedly running a scheme that included Maduro's inner circle and stole hundreds of millions in dollars from food-import contracts at a time of widespread hunger mainly due to shortages in the South American country.
36% : Perhaps the most-high-profile prisoner exchange came last December when the U.S. government, over the objections of some Republicans in Congress and criticism from some law enforcement officials, traded Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout for WNBA star Brittney Griner.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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