Nature Article Rating

US Supreme Court hobbles the EPA's authority over climate emissions

Jul 01, 2022 View Original Article
  • Bias Rating

    6% Center

  • Reliability

    N/AN/A

  • Policy Leaning

    34% Medium Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -50% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

Overall Sentiment

N/A

  •   Liberal
  •   Conservative
SentenceSentimentBias
Unlock this feature by upgrading to the Pro plan.

Bias Meter

Extremely
Liberal

Very
Liberal

Moderately
Liberal

Somewhat Liberal

Center

Somewhat Conservative

Moderately
Conservative

Very
Conservative

Extremely
Conservative

-100%
Liberal

100%
Conservative

Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

57% : Although a federal spending bill that would allocate more than half a trillion dollars to climate programmes over the next decade remains mired in Congress, lawmakers last year enacted a bipartisan infrastructure package that included more than US$200 billion in clean energy and climate investments.
49% :The case the court ruled on, West Virginia v. the US Environmental Protection Agency, was the most consequential climate litigation in the United States in 15 years.
48% : The ruling prohibits the EPA from crafting broad regulations to drive the US power industry away from coal and towards cleaner energy sources such as wind and solar.
46% : Capping carbon dioxide emissions to force a national shift away from coal to cleaner energy sources may be a "sensible" climate solution, the justices wrote in the majority decision, but it is "not plausible" that the US Congress meant to grant such authority to the EPA when it wrote the Clean Air Act.
44% : Anticipating how the Biden administration would try to regulate the power industry, the coalition of Republican-led states and coal companies that filed the lawsuit sought a preemptive ban on broad regulations that would effectively overhaul the US power industry, arguing that the 1970 Clean Air Act limits the agency's regulatory power to the scale of individual power plants.
10% : The US Supreme Court has limited the regulatory tools that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can use to curb greenhouse-gas emissions, dealing a massive blow to US President Joe Biden's climate agenda.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

Copy link