TribLIVE Article Rating

Affirmative action is out in higher education so what's next for college admissions?

  • Bias Rating

    54% Very Conservative

  • Reliability

    25% ReliablePoor

  • Policy Leaning

    64% Very Conservative

  • Politician Portrayal

    -4% Negative

Bias Score Analysis

The A.I. bias rating includes policy and politician portrayal leanings based on the author’s tone found in the article using machine learning. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral.

Sentiments

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Bias Meter

Contributing sentiments towards policy:

61% : In several decisions dating to the 1970s, the Supreme Court had upheld affirmative action in college admissions.
48% : With affirmative action off the table, colleges face mounting pressure to end other admission practices that disproportionately benefit white and wealthy students.
48% : Colleges are sending a welcoming message in hopes of avoiding the type of drop-off among Black and Hispanic students that have been seen in some states that outlawed affirmative action.
38% : In states that already banned affirmative action, colleges responded by recruiting more low-income students, hoping that wealth would act as a proxy for race.
37% : Students walk through a gate at Harvard University, Thursday, June 29, in Cambridge, Mass.Colleges across the country will be forced to stop considering race in admissions under Thursday's Supreme Court ruling, ending affirmative action policies that date back decades.
32% : Nine states have separately banned affirmative action at private universities, including California, Michigan, Florida and Washington.

*Our bias meter rating uses data science including sentiment analysis, machine learning and our proprietary algorithm for determining biases in news articles. Bias scores are on a scale of -100% to 100% with higher negative scores being more liberal and higher positive scores being more conservative, and 0% being neutral. The rating is an independent analysis and is not affiliated nor sponsored by the news source or any other organization.

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